The importance of binding nominations in estate planning

Feb 12, 2020 | Global Property

It’s a common misconception that superannuation automatically transfers to the super fund owner’s estate upon their death. 

This isn’t the case. Instead, it is up to the trustee of the fund to pay the death benefit in accordance with the fund’s governing rules and relevant law. This situation might be appropriate for you, for example, if you have a sole dependent. But, you may instead want to have more control over who receives what share of your benefit. To make this happen, you will need to make what is called a binding death benefit nomination.

Before a binding death benefit nomination is ‘valid’ there are several requirements that must be met, such as it must be given in writing to the trustee.

It can include different types of dependents, such as your spouse (including de facto, opposite and same-sex), children of any age (including adopted or ex-nuptial), or any person(s) that are financially dependent or in an interdependency relationship with you. 

Interdependency relationships are close personal relationships between two people who live together, where one provides the financial and domestic support and cares for the other. 

Aside from the dependents, the only non-dependents that can you can nominate as your beneficiaries are your estate or a legal personal representative. Aside from the dependents, the only non-dependents that can you can nominate as your beneficiaries are your estate or a legal personal representative. We recommend you seek independent taxation advice. 1

If you’re an adult aged 18 and over, any number of beneficiaries can be nominated and in whatever proportions you like, but they need to combine for the total (i.e.100%) amount of the estate. 

It’s important to remember that the binding death benefit nomination is no longer valid  if any of the beneficiaries you have nominated cease to be dependent or are no longer your legal personal representative. An example of this might be if your spouse has obtained a divorce. If this happens, revisions will need to be made to the nomination for its validity to be restored.

When the binding nomination is signed by the estate owner, it must be witnessed by two adults who cannot be among the beneficiaries. Each of the signatures must be signed and dated on the same day. Once it is received by the trustee, much like a Will, the nomination is then binding for three years from the date it was signed, unless the superannuation trust deed options allow it to be non-lapsing.

After this is completed you can have peace of mind knowing that the death benefit will be paid quickly to the beneficiaries you nominate and will not be held up by the trustee during the estate distribution. At any time, you have the option to change any of the nominated beneficiaries or the share they will receive.

Generally, after three years, the death benefit nomination becomes non-binding, which gives the trustee discretion to protect the interests of your beneficiaries if their circumstances have changed. An example of this might be if one of the beneficiaries is bankrupt, and the trustee, therefore, elects to avoid putting your super benefit into the hands of the beneficiary’s creditors.

Unlike the binding version, non-binding death benefit nominations don’t have an expiration date but are still worth keeping up-to-date such as when you marry, divorce or have children. The trustee is required by law to distribute to your financial dependents or interdependents where these are present. 

Non-binding death benefit nominations still have the option for nominating the number and share for each of the dependents. Non-financial dependents, however, may be excluded, which is another argument for keeping the binding death benefit nomination valid if this is a decision that you want to control.

Despite the terminology, death benefit nominations are a relatively simple way of increasing the control of your estate. Thinking of it as an adjunct to your Will, it can provide you with a similar peace of mind.

Source: 1 ATO – Super death benefits and Super lump sum table

Important note:
This provides general information and hasn’t taken your circumstances into account.  It’s important to consider your particular circumstances before deciding what’s right for you. Although the information is from sources considered reliable, we do not guarantee that it is accurate or complete. You should not rely upon it and should seek qualified advice before making any investment decision. Except where liability under any statute cannot be excluded, we do not accept any liability (whether under contract, tort or otherwise) for any resulting loss or damage of the reader or any other person.  Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns.

Any general tax information provided in this publication is intended as a guide. It is not intended to be a substitute for specialised taxation advice or an assessment of your liabilities, obligations or claim entitlements that arise, or could arise, under taxation law, and we recommend you consult with a registered tax agent.

Any information provided by the author detailed above is separate and external to our business and our Licensee. Neither our business nor our Licensee takes any responsibility for any action or any service provided by the author.

Any links have been provided with permission for information purposes only and will take you to external websites, which are not connected to our company in any way. Note: Our company does not endorse and is not responsible for the accuracy of the contents/information contained within the linked site(s) accessible from this page.

Brett Dickinson

Brett Dickinson

Director of Global Property at United Global Capital
LREA, DipFinServ
Brett is a Licensed Real Estate Agent and manages United Global Capital’s property projects and client acquisitions.
Brett Dickinson

Latest posts by Brett Dickinson (see all)

The post The importance of binding nominations in estate planning appeared first on Trend Property.

<a href="https://ugc.net.au/author/brett/" target="_self">Brett Dickinson</a>

Brett Dickinson

Brett is a Licensed Real Estate Agent and manages United Global Capital's property projects and client acquisitions.

Recent News

Episode 114: Have The Markets Reacted To a COVID-19 Normal World?

Episode 114: Have The Markets Reacted To a COVID-19 Normal World?

This week’s edition of the investor exchange podcast kicks off with a discussion on the COVID-19 situation in Victoria. It’s been 20 days since Victoria recorded its last case and is on track towards a COVID normal Christmas. Following that, Louis talks about the benefits of holiday for your mental health which in turn impacts our performance in work and in life. Brett takes us through the changes in stamp duty that will soon be in place for home buyers soon and breaks down what the costs and benefits will be. Finally, Joel provides a share market update and highlighting the current situation in the United States.

STAY UP TO DATE

Subscribe here to receive all UGC updates as they happen

Good Move! Keep an eye on your inbox for our next update.